Would I Lie to You?

Apparently, If you are a Commissioner of Education, the answer is YES! Lies abound from the offices of NYSED.

The lies are scary – intended, one can only imagine, to stop the recent vocal resistance through REFUSALS of the State Exams slated to begin in mid-April. The good folks at WNYers For Public Education ( http://www.wnyforpubliced.com/index.html)  have done a great job of exposing the lies told to Superintendents, Principals, Teachers and Parents. (See FAQ)

They have also created a great “Tools” section which includes what_you_need_to_know_about_refusing_state_tests.

As a teacher, let me tell you one of the BIGGEST lies being told, being bought, and being argued as PROOF that we actually NEED and should LOVE High Stakes Testings. The lie is that:

“These tests and the results help teachers inform and improve their instruction for all children.” 

My beautiful, funny, intelligent, inquisitive, creative first graders have taken both the STAR Reading and the STAR Math tests twice this year, unless of course, they have been “identified” as needing intervention – those poor kids have taken the tests MANY, MANY times. After the test, each student’s score is available to me immediately, you know, so that I can inform and improve my instruction. For my convenience, there is even an “Instructional Planning Report” for each child! Well, hallelujah, because you know – without it I wouldn’t have a clue where each child has room to improve!

These are direct quotes, taken from multiple “planning reports” for both Reading and Math:

“Understand that nouns can also be verbs”  “Identify the topic of a text”  “Recognize playful uses of language such as riddles and tongue twisters”  “Identify how words or phrases in literary text appeal to the senses” “Apply the vocabulary of position or direction” ” Count back by ones between 20 and 100″ “Count objects to 20”

Guess what?? I already know those things about the students that these comments were generated for! I knew most of it within the first month of school, and I could have predicted for the makers of the STAR tests, which of my students would score in the “watch” “intervention” or “urgent intervention” bands of their lovely color-coded charts. Additionally, I have already planned my instruction based on my DAILY INTERACTION with my students!

For those who teach grades 3 and up, the idea that a test score helps them plan and inform instruction is even more laughable. Test scores are not returned until mid-summer – by then isn’t it just a little too late to plan instruction?

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2 thoughts on “Would I Lie to You?

  1. Betsy Marshall

    Absolutely!!! As a teacher of many years, I concur with everything you have written. I did use the STAR math assessments a couple of years ago. I did not need them to tell me about my students or “inform my instruction”, but they were useful to take to meetings when I wanted to make the argument that a child was in need of additional services through remediation or sometimes special education. The State Standardized test do not give me any useful information as a teacher.

    Reply
    1. antiqueteacher60 Post author

      A standardized test can, in fact, give some important data as you point out. The testing done in the CSE process is helpful – and I find the Speech and Language testing especially fascinating. However, in most cases, the data from those tests (used sparingly) the tests either confirmed what I already knew, or gave a name to what I did not understand.
      I am not opposed to standardized testing per se, but to its ABUSE and the lie connected to it – that I NEED my students to undergo hours and hours of high stakes standardized tests to “inform” me.

      Reply

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